Performance + Recovery

bheat

Brain Cooling and Athletic Performance

Your body has built in radiators in different places that help us dissipate heat so that your athletic performance is not affected.   Though the head and neck only make up 10% of your body, it has a tremendous amount of capability to clear extra heat from your system.  That’s a good thing because when your brain gets overheated your athletic performance suffers.   This is a fact.  Why?  Because the heat overwhelms your brain and nervous system making it difficult to send enough of the right signals to the muscles to activate them correctly.   So, in essence, a hot brain will fatigue your body. How do you fix this?  It turns out that by cooling the head and neck before and during exercise you can reduce the strain that heat puts on your body and actually improve your performance. Studies have shown a 51% improvement in exercise time to fatigue by using head cooling methods.   How does it do this?   Well, for the reasons listed above, a head and neck-cooling unit seems to extract head from those areas.  This results in a decrease of muscle fatigue, improved physical performance, and an enhanced exercise recovery.   There are mental advantages of cooling off as well.  Studies have also shown an improvement in perceived comfort by using head cooling.  In other words, by dampening the mental strain associated with being overheated, you allow your mind to stay sharper and more focused. In conclusion, cooling your head and neck with such products as the CryoHelmet many not only protect your brain but improve your athletic and mental performance as well.

 

 

REFERENCES:

  1.  http://sciencenordic.com/hot-brains-impair-athletic-performance
  2. http://aups.org.au/Proceedings/32(2)Suppl.1/122P/122P.pdf
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18052690
  4. http://news.stanford.edu/news/2012/august/cooling-glove-research-082912.htm
  5. http://www.safeeurope.co.uk/media/3426/richard_massey.pdf
  6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3017491/
  7. http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2013/08/14/bjsports-2012-091739.abstract
  8. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/29/lessons-from-exercising-in-the-heat/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0